Contributions

Law enforce­ment agen­cies are increas­ing­ly seek­ing to com­pel the dis­clo­sure of pass­words from the own­ers of pass­word-pro­tect­ed encrypt­ed devices, such as cell phones. Does the gov­ern­ment have the right to com­pel this dis­clo­sure? In this Con­tri­bu­tion, Diego Wright (‘22) argues that the Fifth Amend­ment right against self-incrim­i­na­tion pro­tects an indi­vid­ual from being forced to dis­close their pass­code when ana­lyzed under the “fore­gone con­clu­sion” doc­trine unless the gov­ern­ment can demon­strate they already know the tes­ti­mo­ni­al com­mu­ni­ca­tions tac­it in the act of pro­vid­ing the passcode.

Contributions

This Con­tri­bu­tion exam­ines whether com­pli­ance with the Fifth Amend­ment should shield a fed­er­al con­dem­na­tion action from a First Amend­ment retal­i­a­tion claim. Han­nah Beat­tie (’21) argues that the ratio­nales for carv­ing out safe har­bors for gov­ern­ment action to be free from First Amend­ment scruti­ny if in com­pli­ance with the Fourth Amend­ment do not extend to the Fifth Amend­ment con­text. Ulti­mate­ly, this Con­tri­bu­tion con­cludes that an indi­vid­ual should be able to raise a First Amend­ment retal­i­a­tion defense to a con­dem­na­tion action, even if the gov­ern­ment com­plied with the Fifth Amendment.